First time to register on this site?

We recommend that you first set up a permanent student profile before registering for a class.

This way, your class history will be saved in one place and all of your forms will auto-fill (once you log in).  

 1) On home page, subscribe to receive announcements.  2) In the blue box, click on "profile" and fill out the form with your contact info.   3) You will be sent a link and may log back in and update the password.

Upcoming events

    • Tuesday, April 21, 2020
    • 9:00 AM
    • Wednesday, April 22, 2020
    • 4:30 PM
    • Lacey Community Center, Lacey
    • 0


    This two-day class is geared towards those who design and implement compensatory mitigation and restoration projects and/or those who review and condition mitigation plans who want more technical information. This class focuses on factors to consider when designing wetland projects and protocols to help ensure their success.



    Topic include:

    • Factors to consider for site selection
    • How to develop realistic site-specific goals and objectives and measurable performance standards
    • Water (sources and potential hydroperiods - what to look for and evaluate)
    • Soils (salvaging, amendments, compaction)
    • Vegetation (source of plant material, salvaging, planting specifications, improving survival, establishing appropriate vegetation communities)
    • Invasive species (techniques for control and maintenance)
    • Habitat (design considerations)
    • Plan specifications (mulches, irrigation, plant materials, habitat features)
    • Construction and installation considerations
    • Contingencies, maintenance, and monitoring

    Class participants should already have a general understanding of wetland ecology and regulations.

    Note: The information provided in this class is generally consistent with the 2006 interagency document, “Wetland Mitigation in Washington State,” Parts 1 and 2. However, it does not address the agencies’ specific policies and requirements for mitigation. The interagency mitigation guidance document can be found at:

    https://ecology.wa.gov/Water-Shorelines/Wetlands/Mitigation/Interagency-guidance

    (13 CM Credits)

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructors:  Susan Buis is a restoration ecologist and native plant horticulturist currently working for the US Army Corps of Engineers and the WA State Dept of Transportation. She is also co-founder and former co-owner of Sound Native Plants, an Olympia company that provides a full spectrum of restoration services including design, installation, native plant propagation, maintenance, and monitoring. Before founding her company in 1991, she worked for Yosemite and Olympic National Parks, where she developed and managed restoration projects and native plant propagation. Ms. Buis has been teaching workshops in restoration design and installation to professional groups and agencies since 1996 and has published articles on creating restoration plant specifications in Hortus West and in Native Plants Journal. She is a regular guest lecturer on native plant topics in the coastal NW.

     

    Lisa Palazzi is a Certified Professional Wetland Scientist (SWS-PCP) and a Certified Professional Soil Scientist (SSSA).  She has over 28 years of professional experience evaluating wetlands, soils and hydrology in the Pacific Northwest. Ms. Palazzi has provided expert advice and expert witness services on many hydric soils and wetlands hydrology functions in the Puget Sound region to many different municipalities and agencies. She consistently receives high marks as a teacher from her students and from workshop participants in these subjects, and she has taught in many different settings, ranging from University-level certification courses to professional conference workshops and even as a guest speaker in elementary, middle school and high school classes. Therefore, she is not only technically competent in her field of expertise, but capable of explaining that knowledge to a wide range of audiences. She is familiar with the most common mistakes and misinterpretations of soils and hydrology characteristics made that can cause a restoration project to fail. 


     


    • Tuesday, April 28, 2020
    • 9:00 AM
    • Wednesday, April 29, 2020
    • 5:00 PM
    • Brightwater Center, Woodinville
    • 5
    Register

    In this 2-day interactive workshop, you will learn how to conduct an assessment, use a logic model to plan a new project or reassess a current one, and prepare for a meaningful evaluation. You'll also learn project planning practices that will help you incorporate accountability and strategic thinking, reveal assumptions, and create a targeted effort with measurable results. This workshop is taught by national trainers from NOAA's Office for Coastal Management.
    (14 AICP credits/ CEP points)


    *This class was formerly called Project Design and Evaluation. It has been updated and streamlined to make even more applicable to your specific project.


    Instructors:  Pam Kylstra is a program development specialist with the NOAA Office for Coastal Management. She develops and delivers training programs, serves as an evaluator of coastal programs and National Estuarine Research Reserves (NERR), and provides facilitation services for the coastal resource management community, including Sea Grant, NERRs, and other federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. Ms. Kylstra holds a Master of Science in marine resource management from Oregon State University’s College of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and a Bachelor of Science in zoology from North Carolina State University. She also has completed certification courses in instructional design, facilitation, and mediation.


    Liz Lasicki is a training specialist at the NOAA Office for Coastal Management. Liz delivers trainings on project design and evaluation and adapting to coastal risk. She also provides meeting facilitation services. She graduated from the Coast Guard Academy and served as Coast Guard officer interdicting drug smugglers in the Caribbean and conducting search and rescue missions in the Pacific Northwest. After obtaining her Master's Degree in Human Resource Development, she worked as a performance consultant for AT&T and then went on to own her own IT consulting company for over 10 years.

    • Thursday, May 07, 2020
    • 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    This class will teach you how to effectively use the Hydric Soil Indicators in the Regional Supplements to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual. You will learn the basic processes that take place in saturated soil, and how to “read the story” in a soil profile. The training includes an introduction to identifying layers, distinguishing concentrations and depletions, and preparing hydric soil descriptions from soil profiles. Each student will have a chance to describe soil profiles and apply the field indicators to their notes.

     

    This workshop will be indoors, with an exercise in the field. Please dress appropriately. (6.5 CM AICP Credits/ CEP Points)

     

    Required class materials to bring:

    • a sharpshooter or tile spade style shovel (if you have one)
    • soil knife
    • tape measure
    • spray bottle for water (if you have one)

    Lunch is provided.


    Instructor: Bob Thomas is a biologist and soil scientist for the Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, Regulatory Branch Branch.  He has extensive experience in the Pacific Northwest in routine delineations, delineations in disturbed areas, and problematic hydric soils.  Mr. Thomas has been teaching hydric soil and delineation workshops to professional groups and agencies since 2000.

     

    • Wednesday, May 13, 2020
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, May 14, 2020
    • 4:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mount Vernon
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    This training provides information and methods for determining the ordinary high water mark (OHWM) as defined in the state Shoreline Management Act (SMA).  Waters regulated under the SMA include all tidal waters, streams greater than 20 cubic feet per second mean annual flow, water bodies greater than 20 acres in size and any associated wetlands and deltas.  Field visits to each of the SMA water types will give you the opportunity to apply the methods discussed in the classroom.        

                           

    In this training, you will learn answers to these questions:      

    - How is the OHWM defined and where does it apply?

    - What is the regulatory context and history of the OHWM?

    - Why it is important to use field indicators to determine the OHWM?

    - What are the most reliable field indicators on tidal waters, streams, lakes and associated wetlands?

    - What are some common misconceptions about OHWM determinations?

    (12 AICP CM Credits / CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructors:  

     

    Zach Meyer is a Wetlands/Shorelands Specialist with the WA State Department of Ecology. In the last few years with Ecology, Zach has been involved in environmental planning, permitting, and providing technical assistance to local jurisdictions.  Zach’s educational background includes a Master’s degree in Marine and Environmental Affairs from the University of Washington, and undergraduate studies in anthropology and biology from Indiana University. 


    Rebecca Rothwell has a BS in biology from the University of Puget Sound (2002) and a master’s of environmental studies from The Evergreen State College (2010). She has worked for Ecology since 2008, doing wetland mitigation compliance, wetland and shoreland permitting, assistance with CAO and SMP updates, OHWM determinations, and technical assistance with local governments.

     

    Lynn Schmidt is the Department of Ecology’s Statewide Flood Engineer, focusing on reducing flood risks to communities while enhancing natural floodplain functions. Her career has spanned a wide range of topics within the environmental and hydraulics engineering fields, including hydraulic modeling, river restoration, floodplain management, stormwater management, environmental investigations, and monitoring. Lynn holds a BS in Civil Engineering, MS in Environmental Engineering, and is a Professional Engineer and Certified Floodplain Manager.

     

    • Thursday, May 21, 2020
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Lacey Community Center, Lacey
    • 4
    Register

    This 1-day training will demonstrate the Department of Fish and Wildlife’s methods for conducting beach surveys and processing samples for Surf Smelt and Sand Lance spawn.  The training will include a classroom component with a presentation and hands-on demonstration of lab techniques. It will also include a field component with a demonstration and time to practice field collection and sample processing. The training is specifically designed for biologists who need to conduct forage fish surveys for regulatory purposes, such as to comply with the conditions of a WDFW, DNR, or ACoE permit. At the conclusion of training, participants will have knowledge of forage fish survey techniques and reporting requirements.

    (6 AICP CM Credits/CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructor:  Hannah Faulkner is a nearshore biologist with the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife Habitat Science Team. Her current research interests include monitoring effects of shoreline modification on nearshore habitat, identifying and assessing the distribution and characteristics of forage fish spawning habitat, assessing new methods of detecting forage fish spawn, monitoring the implementation of marine bulkhead HPA permits, and exploring new survey methods and data processing techniques using unmanned aircraft systems (UAS).

    • Friday, May 22, 2020
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Lacey Community Center, Lacey
    • 6
    Register

    This 1-day training will demonstrate the Department of Fish and Wildlife’s methods for conducting beach surveys and processing samples for Surf Smelt and Sand Lance spawn.  The training will include a classroom component with a presentation and hands-on demonstration of lab techniques. It will also include a field component with a demonstration and time to practice field collection and sample processing. The training is specifically designed for biologists who need to conduct forage fish surveys for regulatory purposes, such as to comply with the conditions of a WDFW, DNR, or ACoE permit. At the conclusion of training, participants will have knowledge of forage fish survey techniques and reporting requirements.

    (6 AICP CM Credits/CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructor:  Hannah Faulkner is a nearshore biologist with the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife Habitat Science Team. Her current research interests include monitoring effects of shoreline modification on nearshore habitat, identifying and assessing the distribution and characteristics of forage fish spawning habitat, assessing new methods of detecting forage fish spawn, monitoring the implementation of marine bulkhead HPA permits, and exploring new survey methods and data processing techniques using unmanned aircraft systems (UAS).

    • Wednesday, May 27, 2020
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, May 28, 2020
    • 5:00 PM
    • Lacey Community Center, Lacey
    • 0

    Successful use of wetland identification and assessment tools includes an understanding of different wetland classification systems and how to apply them. This two-day class will introduce participants to four different classification systems used in wetland work, Cowardin, Hydrogeomorphic (HGM), U.S. National Vegetation Classification (USNVC), and Landscape, Land form, Water flow path, Waterbody type (LLWW). Participants will learn about the background and development of the classification systems, how to apply and interpret them at site and landscape levels, and general caveats associated with using different wetland classification systems.


    The Cowardin classification system is the framework for wetland polygons in the National Wetland Inventory (NWI) published by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Cowardin and HGM classification systems are used in the Washington Wetland Rating System (2014 Update) to characterize a wetland’s potential for hydrologic, water quality, and habitat functions and ecosystem services. Misclassification results in inaccurate assessments of wetland functions and levels of performance, which can affect mitigation requirements and buffers. In Washington, buffers are established based on an assessment of the wetland’s sensitivity and rarity and the functions it provides. Cowardin and HGM classification are integral components of those assessments.


    The USNVC was recently modified by Washington Natural Heritage Program (WNHP) to more explicitly incorporate ecological relationships among plant associations. The resulting classification unit, subgroups, are specific to Washington’s wetlands. Subgroups are used to inform conservation targets (e.g., Wetlands of High Conservation Value) and as a basis for conducting Ecological Integrity Assessment (EIA) for wetlands and riparian areas in Washington. These classification systems are also used in mapping applications, including NHP’s newly developed Wetlands of High Conservation Value Map Viewer and Ecology’s update to the NWI. Ecology recently updated NWI polygons in two demonstration areas and applied LLWW modifiers to enhance NWI classification for better characterization of wetlands and preliminary assessment of wetland functions.

    (14 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructors: 


    Dr. Amy Yahnke is the senior wetland ecologist for the Shorelands and Environmental Assistance Program at the Washington State Department of Ecology. She holds a Certificate in Wetland Science and Management, BS in Environmental Horticulture, MS in Forest Resources, and PhD in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. She has studied wetland ecology within the contexts of amphibians, invasive plants, and stormwater management. Dr. Yahnke has experience teaching a wide range of environmental topics to audiences of all ages.

     

    Joe Rocchio is the Program Manager of the Washington Department of Natural Resources, Natural Heritage Program (WNHP). He supports WNHP's staff of two ecologists, botanist, data manager, and information specialist in providing essential data to planners and landowners to assist them in making informed land use decisions that balance economic growth with the conservation of our state’s natural heritage. WNHP also plays an integral role in nominating sites to be included in Washington's statewide system of natural area preserves.  Before taking on the Program Manager role, Joe spent 12 years as one of WNHP's ecologists, at which time his primary responsibilities were to maintain a statewide ecosystem classification, develop and implement methods to assess ecological integrity, and identify ecosystem conservation priorities. Joe has worked with most of Washington’s ecosystems, although wetlands (especially peatlands) are his expertise. Since joining WNHP in 2007, a significant portion of his work has focused on classifying Washington wetlands using the U.S. National Vegetation Classification and developing a rapid assessment protocol to assess wetland condition (i.e., Ecological Integrity Assessment). Joe has a B.S. in Environmental Science from Indiana University and M.S. in Ecosystem Analysis from the University of Washington. Joe is a Regional Editor for the U.S. National Vegetation Classification Review Board and the Vice Chair of NatureServe's U.S. Section Council. 

     

     

    • Wednesday, June 03, 2020
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Ecology's Central Regional Office, Yakima (Union Gap)
    • 2
    Register

    When stakeholder engagement is not done thoughtfully, or breaks down altogether, projects can falter, budgets can implode, and the phone can ring off the hook - usually with an unhappy boss, elected official, or irate citizen on the other end!

    This interactive, hands-on training will transform your ability to engage and communicate with stakeholders – both internally and externally - in ways that are efficient, meaningful and will help your project or program succeed. Stakeholder engagement is a crucial aspect of natural resource management. However, many resource managers, planners, and other professionals have either a limited understanding of how to engage stakeholders successfully and/or limited time and budget to do it effectively. Almost everyone has a story of a project that went sideways because of poorly planned or executed stakeholder engagement strategies.

    In this class, you will learn about the increasingly important role that stakeholders play in ecosystem recovery efforts. You will also learn:

    • The building blocks of an effective stakeholder engagement plan and strategies for engaging stakeholders early and for sustained periods of time;
    • How to properly identify stakeholders and make distinctions between different “types” of stakeholders;
    • How to develop efficient, cost-effective strategies that are most effective for each stakeholder group, including whether to form citizens’ or technical advisory committees, and hold public meetings;
    • How to build trust by incorporating stakeholder input in project/program outcomes;
    • How to choose the most effective tools for the job and use it effectively - PowerPoint or glossy brochure? Traditional media or social media? Listserv or PSA? Workshop or public meeting?

    This class is built around lessons learned from 20+ years of stakeholder engagement in the Salish Sea region and U.S. west coast. (6 CM credits)

     

    Lunch is provided.


    Instructors: Hilary Wilkinson and Sarah Brace have designed and implemented stakeholder engagement processes related to Salish Sea ecosystem recovery efforts for close to two decades. In 2008, they co-founded Veda Environmental, a firm dedicated to connecting the dots between science, policy and people in order to protect and restore ecosystems. www.vedaenv.com  Sarah and Hilary design and deliver science communication and stakeholder engagement trainings to federal, state and industry representatives, most recently at the 2017 International Oil Spill Conference. Their audience also includes natural resource managers, scientists, and communications experts from public and private entities. Prior to founding Veda, Hilary and Sarah worked for local government (Hilary) and state (Hilary and Sarah) resource agencies leading public/stakeholder outreach efforts and science/technical advisory panels.
    • Thursday, June 11, 2020
    • 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    • Lacey Community Center, Lacey
    • 24
    Register

    In this one-day class, you will gain familiarity with the contents and use of the Marine Shoreline Design Guidelines (MSDG). These guidelines address the design of alternative options for shoreline protection. The course will emphasize how to conduct a site assessment and alternatives analysis, along with a high-level overview of the permitting issues associated with these types of projects. Examples will be explored for different techniques to address shoreline protection. You will learn how to use a checklist approach to analyze alternative shoreline protection options. While not required, it would benefit you to have a familiarity with the basic understanding of shoreline processes as taught in the Coastal Training Program course "Puget Sound Coastal Process, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration." (6.5 CM Credits/CEP Points)


    Lunch is provided.


    Instructors: Corey Morss is an Environmental Engineer working for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Habitat Program. Corey provides technical assistance to WDFW Habitat Biologists statewide, as well as designing and constructing restoration projects in marine and freshwater environments. Corey has developed and delivered trainings on water crossings, marine shoreline protection (MSDG), fluvial geomorphology, reading engineering plans, and fish friendly construction considerations. Corey is passionate about the outdoors and spends most of his spare time hiking, camping, backpacking, hunting, fishing, boating or dreaming about those things.


    Nicole Faghin is a Coastal Management Specialist at Washington Sea Grant. She is a trained land use and environmental planner and lawyer specializing in waterfront planning issues. Nicole is a frequent lecturer for the Coastal Training Program and on the CTP Advisory Group. She has also taught courses at the UW Seattle Urban Planning Program, UW Tacoma Urban Studies Program, and has been a guest lecturer at the UW School of Marine and Environmental Affairs.


    • Monday, June 22, 2020
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 15
    Register



    This full-day course is designed for consultants and others who work with projects that may involve eelgrass, and who need to have a basic understanding of eelgrass biology, distribution, mapping and delineation.




    Course topics will include the following:

    • Eelgrass biology
    • Eelgrass functions and ecosystem services
    • Species identification
    • Distribution patterns
    • Methods for mapping eelgrass
    • Delineation of eelgrass bed boundaries using the new Corps eelgrass delineation guidance

    The class will consist of a half-day classroom session in the morning, followed by a half-day of field exercises designed to familiarize participants with the new Corps of Engineers Eelgrass Delineation guidance. Class participants should expect to encounter wet conditions, soft sediments, with a fair amount of walking to and from the parking lot and tidal flats.


    (6.0 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

    Instructor: Dr. Deborah Shafer Nelson is a Biologist with the Seattle District Army Corps of Engineers. She has had experience in seagrass research and management since 1992. She recently developed the eelgrass delineation guidance methodology that is currently being used by Seattle District Army Corps of Engineers Regulatory. Her research expertise includes seagrass physiology, habitat requirements, restoration, functional assessment, impact assessment, interactions between native and introduced seagrasses in the PNW, and the potential effect of climate change on PNW seagrass distribution. Dr. Nelson is the author of numerous peer-reviewed journal articles, technical reports, and technical notes.

    • Tuesday, June 23, 2020
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 17
    Register



    This full-day course is designed for consultants and others who work with projects that may involve eelgrass, and who need to have a basic understanding of eelgrass biology, distribution, mapping and delineation.




    Course topics will include the following:

    • Eelgrass biology
    • Eelgrass functions and ecosystem services
    • Species identification
    • Distribution patterns
    • Methods for mapping eelgrass
    • Delineation of eelgrass bed boundaries using the new Corps eelgrass delineation guidance

    The class will consist of a half-day classroom session in the morning, followed by a half-day of field exercises designed to familiarize participants with the new Corps of Engineers Eelgrass Delineation guidance. Class participants should expect to encounter wet conditions, soft sediments, with a fair amount of walking to and from the parking lot and tidal flats.


    (6.0 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

    Instructor: Dr. Deborah Shafer Nelson is a Biologist with the Seattle District Army Corps of Engineers. She has had experience in seagrass research and management since 1992. She recently developed the eelgrass delineation guidance methodology that is currently being used by Seattle District Army Corps of Engineers Regulatory. Her research expertise includes seagrass physiology, habitat requirements, restoration, functional assessment, impact assessment, interactions between native and introduced seagrasses in the PNW, and the potential effect of climate change on PNW seagrass distribution. Dr. Nelson is the author of numerous peer-reviewed journal articles, technical reports, and technical notes.

Past events

Wednesday, March 25, 2020 POSTPONED-How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, March 11, 2020 POSTPONED-Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Tuesday, March 03, 2020 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, February 26, 2020 Winter Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Wednesday, February 12, 2020 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Thursday, February 06, 2020 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Tuesday, February 04, 2020 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Wednesday, January 22, 2020 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Thursday, January 16, 2020 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, December 04, 2019 Adaptation Planning for Coastal Communities
Friday, November 22, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, November 13, 2019 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington (Intended for River Restorationists)
Tuesday, November 05, 2019 Environmental Negotiations
Friday, November 01, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, October 16, 2019 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, October 09, 2019 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Tuesday, October 01, 2019 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, September 25, 2019 CANCELLED - Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs in Eastern WA
Tuesday, September 17, 2019 Facilitation Skills for Scientists, Planners and Resource Managers
Thursday, September 12, 2019 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Wednesday, September 11, 2019 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, July 09, 2019 Riparian and Wetland Plant Identification in Central and Eastern WA
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 Using the Marine Shoreline Design Guidelines for Marine Shoreline Stabilization
Thursday, June 06, 2019 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
Wednesday, May 22, 2019 Designing and Installing Mitigation and Restoration Projects
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Thursday, May 09, 2019 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Tuesday, May 07, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, May 01, 2019 Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings
Wednesday, April 17, 2019 Designing and Installing Mitigation and Restoration Projects
Thursday, April 11, 2019 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 03, 2019 Planning Effective Projects
Wednesday, March 20, 2019 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 14, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, March 13, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, March 06, 2019 Plant Identification in Central and Eastern Washington Habitats
Wednesday, January 30, 2019 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Tuesday, January 15, 2019 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Tuesday, November 27, 2018 Environmental Negotiations
Wednesday, November 14, 2018 Gaining Project Traction with Stakeholders: Strategies for Effective and Efficient Engagement
Thursday, November 08, 2018 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Tuesday, October 30, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, October 10, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, October 03, 2018 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, September 26, 2018 Lower Your Risk: Taking the Mystery out of Cultural Resource Management
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 Facilitation Skills for Scientists, Planners and Resource Managers
Wednesday, September 12, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Friday, June 29, 2018 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Thursday, June 28, 2018 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Wednesday, June 20, 2018 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, June 06, 2018 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
Thursday, May 31, 2018 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Wednesday, May 23, 2018 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark in Eastern WA
Thursday, May 17, 2018 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, May 08, 2018 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 25, 2018 Gaining Project Traction with Stakeholders: Strategies for Effective and Efficient Engagement
Thursday, March 15, 2018 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Thursday, March 08, 2018 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Thursday, February 15, 2018 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Monday, January 29, 2018 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Tuesday, December 12, 2017 Adaptation Planning for Coastal Communities
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 Environmental Negotiations
Monday, October 16, 2017 Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings
Thursday, October 12, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Thursday, October 05, 2017 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, October 04, 2017 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, September 13, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, June 14, 2017 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Tuesday, June 13, 2017 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Wednesday, June 07, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Tuesday, June 06, 2017 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, May 25, 2017 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 Enhancing Your Presentations: Additional Techniques for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, May 02, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Thursday, April 20, 2017 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Thursday, April 13, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark in Eastern WA
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 16, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 22, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 15, 2017 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Wednesday, February 01, 2017 Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Thursday, January 19, 2017 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, January 11, 2017 How to Communicate about Sea Level Rise
Tuesday, December 06, 2016 Planning Effective Projects
Tuesday, November 08, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, November 03, 2016 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Tuesday, October 25, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, October 18, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Thursday, October 13, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, October 05, 2016 Identifying Wetlands of High Conservation Value Using Vegetation Classification and the Ecological Integrity Assessment (EIA)
Wednesday, October 05, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Wednesday, September 28, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, June 15, 2016 Shoreline Management and Stabilization Using Vegetation (Updated!)
Thursday, June 09, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, June 07, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, June 02, 2016 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration (Updated!)
Wednesday, May 18, 2016 Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings (Updated!)
Wednesday, May 04, 2016 Shoreline Management and Stabilization Using Vegetation (Updated!)
Wednesday, April 27, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, April 07, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Wednesday, April 06, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Tuesday, March 22, 2016 Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)
Wednesday, March 02, 2016 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Tuesday, February 23, 2016 Environmental Negotiations
Thursday, February 18, 2016 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, February 03, 2016 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Monday, January 25, 2016 High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (BOTH MORNING AND AFTERNOON)
Monday, January 25, 2016 High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (MORNING SESSION ONLY)
Thursday, January 14, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Tuesday, December 01, 2015 Climate Adaptation for Coastal Communities
Thursday, November 19, 2015 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, October 08, 2015 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, September 30, 2015 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Wednesday, September 16, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Tuesday, June 16, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Thursday, May 28, 2015 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration (Updated!)
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 Environmental Negotiations
Wednesday, May 06, 2015 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, April 16, 2015 What's New in the Updated Version (2014) of the Washington State Wetland Rating System for Eastern Washington
Tuesday, March 31, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 12, 2015 What's New in the Updated Version (2014) of the Washington State Wetland Rating System for Western Washington - $95
Thursday, March 05, 2015 How to Administer Development Permits in Eastern Washington’s Shorelines - $75
Thursday, February 26, 2015 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials - $125
Tuesday, February 24, 2015 Wetlands 101 for Local Planners (webinar) - $25
Wednesday, February 18, 2015 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats - $190
Thursday, February 05, 2015 Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats - $95
Tuesday, January 13, 2015 Wetlands 101 for Local Planners (webinar) - $25

Washington State Department of Ecology 

 

© Padilla Bay Reserve

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software