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Upcoming events

    • Tuesday, November 27, 2018
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, November 29, 2018
    • 5:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    This extremely popular 3-day training will provide you with improved skills for effectively participating in complex environmental negotiations. It will give you a better understanding of negotiation principles, approaches, and practices which will significantly improve the outcome of your negotiations.

    The class presents basic negotiation concepts (e.g., Fisher and Ury’s “Getting to Yes” series) and specific environmental issue applications. The skills taught help reduce anxiety about negotiating while helping you to achieve successful outcomes.
     

    You will learn:

    • Simple processes to prepare for negotiations
    • Negotiation principles through simulations and role playing of increasing complexity
    • Principled (ethical) negotiation approaches to build trust and relationships
    • To recognize commonly encountered tactics and shown productive responses

    (21 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

    Instructor:  Jim Nelson held several responsible positions with the California Department of Fish and Game until he retired at the end of 2006. While with DFG he worked on a wide variety projects including: habitat conservation and management projects, regional conservation planning projects, public information and outreach, and large-scale construction monitoring projects. Since the early 1990's Jim has pursued the study and practice of facilitation, negotiation, and mediation for environmental problem solving.

    **For the past 6 years, Jim has taught this class to nearly 500 Department of Ecology employees. This training has the reputation for being the best class Ecology has ever offered.

    • Tuesday, November 27, 2018
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, November 29, 2018
    • 5:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    Register


    If the class is full, please sign up for this waiting list. We will contact you if a space becomes available.


    (The waiting list also helps us know how much demand there is for a course.)
    • Tuesday, January 15, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Wednesday, January 16, 2019
    • 5:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    This 2-day class emphasizes field character identification of the most common freshwater, estuarine wetland, and associated upland buffer species found in the Puget lowland region of Washington State. It is oriented towards the needs of shoreline planners, delineators and those involved with Ordinary High Water Mark determinations, and restoration.


    The format is a lecture/laboratory setup. Each class begins with a short lecture covering the terminology and salient morphological characteristics needed for a taxonomic identification of the species of choice, field characteristics, some ecological aspects of the species’ common habitat, commonly associated species, distribution, potential use for restoration purposes, and any special ecological requirements. Lecture materials include drawings, slides, and dried plant material. Ample dried material will be available for everyone to practice their keying skills. (14 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)


    Recommended text: Cooke. 1997. A Field Guide to the Common Wetland Plants of Western Washington and Northwestern Oregon. Seattle Audubon. (NOTE: This book is currently out of print and is being updated. There will be loaner copies available during class.)


    Recommended text: Hitchcock, c. 1973. Flora of the Pacific Northwest. University of Washington Press.

    Available from Amazon, University Bookstores, Local Libraries.


    Please also bring a plant dissecting kit (at least a pair of forceps and a dissecting needle).


    Lunch is provided. 



    Instructor: Dr. Sarah Cooke specializes in wetland creation, restoration and enhancement projects, both in design and implementation. She excels in permitting assistance on the local, state, and national level. She has conducted scientific research on wetland ecosystems for the Puget Sound Wetland and Stormwater Management Manual. Her expertise includes restoration designs, wetland inventories, wetland delineation, OHWM studies, baseline studies, impact assessments, monitoring programs, rare plant surveys, soil surveys, vegetation mapping, and watershed analysis in the region.

    • Tuesday, January 15, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Wednesday, January 16, 2019
    • 5:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    Register


    If the class is full, please sign up for this waiting list. We will contact you if a space becomes available.


    (The waiting list also helps us know how much demand there is for a course.)
    • Wednesday, January 30, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    • Environmental Services Building, Tacoma (Univ. Place)
    • 15
    Register

    This practical, hands-on class is intended for local government personnel and consultants engaged in shoreline permitting activities. The class will take an in-depth look at the permit process and consider both procedural and substantive shoreline management issues. The Washington Administrative Code (WAC) and Revised Code of Washington (RCW) will be reviewed. A permitting exercise will give attendees the opportunity to apply information they learned in the morning presentation and discussion. Afternoon sessions will focus on permitting issues and case studies related to Shoreline Master Programs updated per WAC Guidelines. This class is appropriate for both beginners and more experienced planners. (6.5 CM AICP Credits/ CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.



    Instructors:
    Misty Blair is a Shoreline Planner with the Washington State Department of Ecology. She currently works on Shoreline Master Program (SMP) Comprehensive Updates, SMP Limited Amendments, and provides technical assistance on SMP implementation for her local jurisdictions which include: King County, Bothell, Des Moines, Duvall, Kent, Mercer Island, Renton, Shoreline, Skykomish, Bremerton, Bainbridge Island, Port Orchard, Brier, Mukilteo, Snohomish, Stanwood, and Woodway.


    Peter Katich  is a  Senior Planner for the City of Gig Harbor where he has managed the update of the City’s Shoreline Master Program in addition to working on a variety of current and long range planning projects. He was an Urban Planner  for the City of Tacoma for 31 years.


    Rick Mraz is a certified Professional Wetland Scientist who works as a Shorelands Technical and Regulatory Lead. He began his career in wetlands work in Lee County, Florida in 1987. He has worked as a field biologist and environmental planner with local, state and federal agencies in Washington since 2001. Rick has degrees in Geology, Field Biology and Philosophy.


    Betty Renkor is a senior shorelines planner with the Department of Ecology, Shorelands and Environmental Assistance Program.  Betty works on Ecology's guidance for Shoreline Master Program updates, including the SMP Handbook and website. She also  assists with SMA policy issues and training. She has worked in environmental and land use planning for local governments and a consulting firm.




    • Wednesday, February 06, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Lacey Community Center, Lacey
    • 15
    Register

     

    What threatens cultural resources and what protects them? This one-day workshop will help you feel more confident and competent in managing the risk associated with cultural resources on any project with a cultural resource component.




    In this training, you will:

    • Be introduced to the Who, How, What, and When of tribal consultation or coordination;
    • Identify the 4 key components needed to fulfill your obligations under Section 106, Executive Order 05-05 and SEPA;
    • Learn which WISSARD Essentials are critical to know;
    • Understand how to kick off Section 106 consultation and what it looks like when you are done;
    • What to do if human remains are found on your project;
    • How to select a Cultural Resources Management professional, including evaluating scope and budget, evaluating the final report, and being aware of best practices.

    Real-life scenarios from the instructor and insights from a tribal representative add richness and depth to this training.


    (6 CM credits)


    Lunch is provided.


    Instructor: Kelly Bush is the Founder and President of Equinox Research and Consulting International Inc. (ERCI). She has three decades of archaeology and cultural resource management experience and has cleaned up disasters on small to large projects here in Washington State. She is now dedicated to averting cataclysmic costs to projects and damage to our precious heritage resources. Working with dozens of state and federal agencies, Kelly helps to facilitate legal solutions between tribes, engineers, architects, funding agencies, landowners, and Washington State’s Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation. In its 16th year, ERCI is an industry leader in ethics and professional standards and in Tribal coordination and consultation.  Kelly received a BA in Archaeology from Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, BC, and has taught archaeology in both classroom and field-school settings at Western Washington University in Bellingham, where she received her MA.



    • Wednesday, February 13, 2019
    • Wednesday, February 27, 2019
    • 2 sessions
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    Do you speak at conferences, public meetings, or other events where you need to convey a specific message? Have you ever felt like you didn’t quite hit the mark by the lackluster reactions of your audience members? Would you like to authentically engage people and help them to consider a different point of view?

    This two-day class (Feb 13 & 27) features best practices for designing presentations and is especially geared towards scientists and professionals who work for local and state agencies.
     
    In this class, you will learn how to:

    •  Transform the way you do PowerPoint;
    •  Use visuals in a way that has impact;
    •   Make your message memorable;
    •   Tell a compelling story;
    •   Create rapport with your audience;
    •   Present data in an accessible way;
    •   Drill down to your most important message.

    The classes will be held two weeks apart. In between, you will develop a short presentation to present to the class on Day Two. This is an opportunity for you to immediately apply what you've learned and to receive positive coaching and feedback. (14 CM AICP Credits/ CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructors:
    Cathy Angell coordinates the Coastal Training Program and has a long history of designing and delivering presentations, as well as coaching others.
    She specializes in presentation skills for educators, scientists, and public officials. A former member of the National Speaker’s Association, she has presented at conferences, colleges, business organizations, and retreats. She recently received a communication award from NOAA named in her honor.

    Nicole Faghin is a Coastal Management Specialist at Washington Sea Grant. She is a trained land use and environmental planner and lawyer specializing in waterfront planning issues. Nicole is a frequent lecturer for the Coastal Training Program and on the CTP Advisory Group. She has also taught courses at the UW Seattle Urban Planning Program, UW Tacoma Urban Studies Program, and has been a guest lecturer at the UW School of Marine and Environmental Affairs.

    • Wednesday, February 13, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Wednesday, February 27, 2019
    • 4:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    Register

     

    If the class is full, please sign up for this waiting list. We will contact you if a space becomes available.


    (The waiting list also helps us know how much demand there is for a course.) 


    • Wednesday, February 20, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 4
    Register

    This 1-day class will emphasize winter field character identification of the wetland species and associated upland buffer species found in the Puget lowland region of Washington (approximately 12 trees and 60 shrubs, including willows). Class instruction will be oriented towards the needs of shoreline planners, delineators, and those involved with Ordinary High Water Mark determinations, and restoration.


    The format will be a lecture/laboratory setup and taxa examined will include common lowland, freshwater (and a few estuarine) species. Fresh material will be provided if in season, and winter characteristics (buds, leaf scars, pith, and bark) will be covered in the winter season. Each class will begin with a short lecture covering the terminology and salient morphological characteristics needed for a taxonomic identification of the species of choice, field characteristics, some ecological aspects of the species’ common habitat, commonly associated species, distribution, potential use for restoration purposes, and any special ecological requirements. Lecture materials will include drawings, slides, and plant material. (6.5 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)


    Suggested text: Cooke. 1997. A Field Guide to the Common Wetland Plants of Western Washington and Northwestern Oregon. Seattle Audubon. Available through University Books Store, Audubon Books Store and Amazon.com.


    Lunch is provided.


    Instructor: Dr. Sarah Cooke specializes in wetland creation, restoration and enhancement projects, both in design and implementation. She excels in permitting assistance on the local, state, and national level. She has conducted scientific research on wetland ecosystems for the Puget Sound Wetland and Stormwater Management Manual. Her expertise includes restoration designs, wetland inventories, wetland delineation, OHWM studies, baseline studies, impact assessments, monitoring programs, rare plant surveys, soil surveys, vegetation mapping, and watershed analysis in the region.

    • Wednesday, March 13, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Registration is closed

     

    (ADDITIONAL CLASS ADDED!)   

    This course is designed to provide participants with a general overview of the purpose of SEPA, the procedural requirements of the SEPA rules, and how SEPA can be used in decision-making. You will learn how to determine when SEPA environmental review is required, evaluate a proposal and make a threshold determination, issue SEPA documents, and use SEPA supplemental authority to condition or deny a proposal. It will also include a section on nonproject environmental analysis and NEPA-SEPA integration. (6 AICP credits)

                

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructor: Annie Szetecz has been a senior planner and policy analyst for Ecology since 2004 and currently oversees the statewide administration of the State Environmental Policy Act including the statewide Register, rulemaking, guidance, training and technical assistance.  She has a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Montana and a J.D. from Lewis and Clark School of Law.



    • Wednesday, March 13, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    Register

    If the class is full, please sign up for this waiting list. We will contact you if a space becomes available.


    (The waiting list also helps us know how much demand there is for a course.)
    • Thursday, March 14, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    Register


    If the class is full, please sign up for this waiting list. We will contact you if a space becomes available.


    (The waiting list also helps us know how much demand there is for a course.)
    • Thursday, March 14, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Registration is closed

     

       

    This course is designed to provide participants with a general overview of the purpose of SEPA, the procedural requirements of the SEPA rules, and how SEPA can be used in decision-making. You will learn how to determine when SEPA environmental review is required, evaluate a proposal and make a threshold determination, issue SEPA documents, and use SEPA supplemental authority to condition or deny a proposal. It will also include a section on nonproject environmental analysis and NEPA-SEPA integration. (6 AICP credits)

                

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructor: Annie Szetecz has been a senior planner and policy analyst for Ecology since 2004 and currently oversees the statewide administration of the State Environmental Policy Act including the statewide Register, rulemaking, guidance, training and technical assistance.  She has a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Montana and a J.D. from Lewis and Clark School of Law.



    • Wednesday, March 20, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, March 21, 2019
    • 4:00 PM
    • Lacey Community Center, Lacey
    • 0
    Registration is closed
    This two-day intensive workshop will provide wetland regulators and consultants with practical information and experience in using the revised rating system for wetlands in western Washington. It is specifically designed for those who will be using the rating system in the field. You will gain a working knowledge of topics such as the hydrogeomorphic classification of wetlands, how to separate wetlands into units for rating, and how to answer all the questions on the field form. The purpose of the class is to provide you with knowledge so that you can fill out the rating form on your own. You will receive a copy of the revised rating system.

    It is important that you already have some experience and/or education in delineating wetlands and identifying natural wetland features such as outlets, boundaries of basins, vegetation classes, and some ability to distinguish between different plant species. The morning sessions will be held inside. The afternoon sessions will be conducted in local wetlands, so dress appropriately. (12 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)
     
    Link to rating system:
    https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/publications/SummaryPages/1406029.html

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructors:  Dr. Amy Yahnke is the senior wetland ecologist for the Shorelands and Environmental Assistance Program at the Washington State Department of Ecology. She holds a Certificate in Wetland Science and Management, BS in Environmental Horticulture, MS in Forest Resources, and PhD in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. She has studied wetland ecology within the contexts of amphibians, invasive plants, and stormwater management. Dr. Yahnke has experience teaching a wide range of environmental topics to audiences of all ages.

     

    Zach Meyer is a Wetlands/Shorelands Specialist with the WA State Department of Ecology. In the last few years with Ecology, Zach has been involved in environmental planning, permitting, and providing technical assistance to local jurisdictions.  Zach’s educational background includes a Master’s degree in Marine and Environmental Affairs from the University of Washington, and undergraduate studies in anthropology and biology from Indiana University.


     


    • Wednesday, March 20, 2019
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, March 21, 2019
    • 4:00 PM
    • Lacey Community Center, Lacey
    Register


    If the class is full, please sign up for this waiting list. We will contact you if a space becomes available.


    (The waiting list also helps us know how much demand there is for a course.)

Past events

Wednesday, November 14, 2018 Gaining Project Traction with Stakeholders: Strategies for Effective and Efficient Engagement
Thursday, November 08, 2018 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Tuesday, October 30, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, October 10, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, October 03, 2018 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, September 26, 2018 Lower Your Risk: Taking the Mystery out of Cultural Resource Management
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 Facilitation Skills for Scientists, Planners and Resource Managers
Wednesday, September 12, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Friday, June 29, 2018 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Thursday, June 28, 2018 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Wednesday, June 20, 2018 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, June 06, 2018 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
Thursday, May 31, 2018 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Wednesday, May 23, 2018 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark in Eastern WA
Thursday, May 17, 2018 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, May 08, 2018 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 25, 2018 Gaining Project Traction with Stakeholders: Strategies for Effective and Efficient Engagement
Thursday, March 15, 2018 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Thursday, March 08, 2018 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Thursday, February 15, 2018 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, January 31, 2018 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Monday, January 29, 2018 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Tuesday, December 12, 2017 Adaptation Planning for Coastal Communities
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 Environmental Negotiations
Monday, October 16, 2017 Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings
Thursday, October 12, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Thursday, October 05, 2017 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, October 04, 2017 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, September 13, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, June 14, 2017 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Tuesday, June 13, 2017 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Wednesday, June 07, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Tuesday, June 06, 2017 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, May 25, 2017 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 Enhancing Your Presentations: Additional Techniques for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, May 02, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Thursday, April 20, 2017 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Thursday, April 13, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark in Eastern WA
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 16, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 22, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 15, 2017 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Wednesday, February 01, 2017 Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Thursday, January 19, 2017 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, January 11, 2017 How to Communicate about Sea Level Rise
Tuesday, December 06, 2016 Planning Effective Projects
Tuesday, November 08, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, November 03, 2016 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Tuesday, October 25, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, October 18, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Thursday, October 13, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, October 05, 2016 Identifying Wetlands of High Conservation Value Using Vegetation Classification and the Ecological Integrity Assessment (EIA)
Wednesday, October 05, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Wednesday, September 28, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, June 15, 2016 Shoreline Management and Stabilization Using Vegetation (Updated!)
Thursday, June 09, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, June 07, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, June 02, 2016 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration (Updated!)
Wednesday, May 18, 2016 Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings (Updated!)
Wednesday, May 04, 2016 Shoreline Management and Stabilization Using Vegetation (Updated!)
Wednesday, April 27, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, April 07, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Wednesday, April 06, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Tuesday, March 22, 2016 Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)
Wednesday, March 02, 2016 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Tuesday, February 23, 2016 Environmental Negotiations
Thursday, February 18, 2016 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, February 03, 2016 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Monday, January 25, 2016 High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (BOTH MORNING AND AFTERNOON)
Monday, January 25, 2016 High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (MORNING SESSION ONLY)
Thursday, January 14, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Tuesday, December 01, 2015 Climate Adaptation for Coastal Communities
Thursday, November 19, 2015 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, October 08, 2015 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, September 30, 2015 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Wednesday, September 16, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Tuesday, June 16, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Thursday, May 28, 2015 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration (Updated!)
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 Environmental Negotiations
Wednesday, May 06, 2015 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, April 16, 2015 What's New in the Updated Version (2014) of the Washington State Wetland Rating System for Eastern Washington
Tuesday, March 31, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 12, 2015 What's New in the Updated Version (2014) of the Washington State Wetland Rating System for Western Washington - $95
Thursday, March 05, 2015 How to Administer Development Permits in Eastern Washington’s Shorelines - $75
Thursday, February 26, 2015 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials - $125
Tuesday, February 24, 2015 Wetlands 101 for Local Planners (webinar) - $25
Wednesday, February 18, 2015 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats - $190
Thursday, February 05, 2015 Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats - $95
Tuesday, January 13, 2015 Wetlands 101 for Local Planners (webinar) - $25

Washington State Department of Ecology 

 

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