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Upcoming events

    • Thursday, January 16, 2020
    • Thursday, January 30, 2020
    • 2 sessions
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    Do you speak at conferences, public meetings, or other events where you need to convey a specific message? Have you ever felt like you didn’t quite hit the mark by the lackluster responses from your audience? Would you like to authentically engage people and help them consider a different point of view?


    This popular and powerful two-day class (Jan 16 & 30) features best practices for designing presentations and is especially geared towards scientists and professionals who work in the public and private sectors.


     
    In this class, you will learn how to:

    •  Transform the way you do PowerPoint;
    •  Deliver a crystal-clear message;
    •  Present data in a way that sticks in people's brains;
    •  Make your data come alive with story-telling;
    •  Keep your audience interested and engaged.

    The classes will be held two weeks apart. In between, you will develop a short presentation to present to the class on Day Two. This is an opportunity for you to immediately apply what you've learned and to receive positive coaching and feedback. (14 CM AICP Credits/ CEP Points)


     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructors:
    Cathy Angell is a presentation coach and trainer with Cathy Angell Communications. She recently launched her own business after coordinating the Coastal Training Program for 18 years. Cathy is nationally known for her transformative methods of presentation design and delivery. She specializes in presentation skills for educators, scientists, and public officials. In 2015, she received a communications award from NOAA named in her honor.

    Nicole Faghin is a Coastal Management Specialist at Washington Sea Grant. She is a trained land use and environmental planner and lawyer specializing in waterfront planning issues. Nicole is a frequent lecturer for the Coastal Training Program and on the CTP Advisory Group. She has also taught courses at the UW Seattle Urban Planning Program, UW Tacoma Urban Studies Program, and has been a guest lecturer at the UW School of Marine and Environmental Affairs.

    • Wednesday, January 22, 2020
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, January 23, 2020
    • 5:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    This 2-day class emphasizes field character identification of the most common freshwater, estuarine wetland, and associated upland buffer plant species found in the Puget lowland region of Washington State and northwest Oregon. It is oriented towards the needs of shoreline planners, delineators and those involved with Ordinary High Water Mark determinations, and restoration.


    The format is a lecture/laboratory setup. Each class begins with a short lecture covering the terminology and salient morphological characteristics needed for a taxonomic identification of the species of choice, field characteristics, some ecological aspects of the species’ common habitat, commonly associated species, distribution, potential use for restoration purposes, and any special ecological requirements. Lecture materials include drawings, slides, and dried plant material. Ample dried material will be available for everyone to practice their keying skills. (14 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)


    Recommended text: There is a new second edition of Hitchcock and Cronquist published in 2018 and edited by David Giblin, Ben Ledger, Peter Zika and Richard Olmstead. That would be preferred if you can get it. If not bring the older version.


    Hitchcock, c. 1973. Flora of the Pacific Northwest. University of Washington Press.


    Also- if you have or can get a hold of a copy of


    A Field Guide to the Common Wetland Plants of Western Washington and Northwestern Oregon Sarah Cooke (Ed) 1997. It is out of print but there will be a few copies to share. Much of the material I discuss is in this book.


    Please also bring a plant dissecting kit (at least a pair of forceps and dissecting needle).


    Lunch is provided. 



    Instructor: Dr. Sarah Cooke specializes in wetland creation, restoration and enhancement projects, both in design and implementation. She excels in permitting assistance on the local, state, and national level. She has conducted scientific research on wetland ecosystems for the Puget Sound Wetland and Stormwater Management Manual. Her expertise includes restoration designs, wetland inventories, wetland delineation, OHWM studies, baseline studies, impact assessments, monitoring programs, rare plant surveys, soil surveys, vegetation mapping, and watershed analysis in the region.

    • Tuesday, February 04, 2020
    • 9:00 AM
    • Wednesday, February 05, 2020
    • 4:30 PM
    • South Puget Sound Community College (Lacey Campus)
    • 9
    Register

    Prerequisite: One or more years of GIS experience.

     

    This 2-day hands-on training provides an introduction to coastal inundation and coastal inundation mapping methods using GIS. Topics include discussion about different types of coastal inundation (i.e., riverine flooding, shallow coastal flooding, sea level rise, storm surge, tsunami), selection of elevation datasets and datums, mapping fundamentals, spatial methodologies used to map flood areas in a coastal environment, and applications and limitations of various types of inundation products.

    Upon completion of the class, you will be able to:

    • Understand mapping for different types of coastal inundation 
    • Understand mapping terminology
    • Access topographic and bathymetric data
    • Perform datum conversions
    • Understand interpolation methods and create digital elevation models
    • Understand coastal and ocean observation data and their applications
    • Map coastal inundation using a GIS
    • Map sea level rise using a modeled tidal surface
    • Understand online mapping technology


    Coastal Inundation Mapping is a technical class focused specifically on data development rather than data use, and therefore requires GIS experience.

    (13 AICP CM Credits/ CEP Points)


    Lunch is provided.


    National Instructor from NOAA:

    Matt Pendleton is a GIS Trainer with the NOAA Office for Coastal Management in Charleston, South Carolina. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Marine Science from Coastal Carolina University and a Master’s Degree in Environmental Studies from the Graduate School at the College of Charleston. He works on a variety of hazard related topics with primary responsibilities including working with the coastal resource management community to build GIS and mapping capacity in the areas of coastal hazards and climate change.
    • Thursday, February 06, 2020
    • 9:00 AM
    • Friday, February 07, 2020
    • 4:30 PM
    • South Puget Sound Community College (Lacey Campus)
    • 5
    Register

    Prerequisite: One or more years of GIS experience.

     

    This 2-day hands-on training provides an introduction to coastal inundation and coastal inundation mapping methods using GIS. Topics include discussion about different types of coastal inundation (i.e., riverine flooding, shallow coastal flooding, sea level rise, storm surge, tsunami), selection of elevation datasets and datums, mapping fundamentals, spatial methodologies used to map flood areas in a coastal environment, and applications and limitations of various types of inundation products.

    Upon completion of the class, you will be able to:

    • Understand mapping for different types of coastal inundation 
    • Understand mapping terminology
    • Access topographic and bathymetric data
    • Perform datum conversions
    • Understand interpolation methods and create digital elevation models
    • Understand coastal and ocean observation data and their applications
    • Map coastal inundation using a GIS
    • Map sea level rise using a modeled tidal surface
    • Understand online mapping technology


    Coastal Inundation Mapping is a technical class focused specifically on data development rather than data use, and therefore requires GIS experience.

    (13 AICP CM Credits/ CEP Points)


    Lunch is provided.


    National Instructor from NOAA:

    Matt Pendleton is a GIS Trainer with the NOAA Office for Coastal Management in Charleston, South Carolina. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Marine Science from Coastal Carolina University and a Master’s Degree in Environmental Studies from the Graduate School at the College of Charleston. He works on a variety of hazard related topics with primary responsibilities including working with the coastal resource management community to build GIS and mapping capacity in the areas of coastal hazards and climate change.
    • Wednesday, February 12, 2020
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, February 13, 2020
    • 5:00 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 17
    Register

    This 2-day class emphasizes field character identification of the most common freshwater, estuarine wetland, and associated upland buffer plant species found in the Puget lowland region of Washington State and northwest Oregon. It is oriented towards the needs of shoreline planners, delineators and those involved with Ordinary High Water Mark determinations, and restoration.


    The format is a lecture/laboratory setup. Each class begins with a short lecture covering the terminology and salient morphological characteristics needed for a taxonomic identification of the species of choice, field characteristics, some ecological aspects of the species’ common habitat, commonly associated species, distribution, potential use for restoration purposes, and any special ecological requirements. Lecture materials include drawings, slides, and dried plant material. Ample dried material will be available for everyone to practice their keying skills. (14 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)


    Recommended text: There is a new second edition of Hitchcock and Cronquist published in 2018 and edited by David Giblin, Ben Ledger, Peter Zika and Richard Olmstead. That would be preferred if you can get it. If not bring the older version.


    Hitchcock, c. 1973. Flora of the Pacific Northwest. University of Washington Press.


    Also- if you have or can get a hold of a copy of


    A Field Guide to the Common Wetland Plants of Western Washington and Northwestern Oregon Sarah Cooke (Ed) 1997. It is out of print but there will be a few copies to share. Much of the material I discuss is in this book.


    Please also bring a plant dissecting kit (at least a pair of forceps and dissecting needle).


    Lunch is provided. 



    Instructor: Dr. Sarah Cooke specializes in wetland creation, restoration and enhancement projects, both in design and implementation. She excels in permitting assistance on the local, state, and national level. She has conducted scientific research on wetland ecosystems for the Puget Sound Wetland and Stormwater Management Manual. Her expertise includes restoration designs, wetland inventories, wetland delineation, OHWM studies, baseline studies, impact assessments, monitoring programs, rare plant surveys, soil surveys, vegetation mapping, and watershed analysis in the region.

    • Wednesday, February 26, 2020
    • 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mt. Vernon
    • 1
    Register

    This 1-day class will emphasize winter field character identification of the woody wetland species and associated upland buffer plant species found in the Puget lowland region of Washington (approximately 12 trees and 60 shrubs, including willows). Class instruction will be oriented towards the needs of shoreline planners, delineators, and those involved with Ordinary High Water Mark determinations, and restoration.


    The format will be a lecture/laboratory setup and taxa examined will include common lowland, freshwater plant species. Twigs will be provided, and winter characteristics (buds, leaf scars, pith, and bark) will be covered in the winter season. Each class will begin with a short lecture covering the terminology and salient morphological characteristics needed for a taxonomic identification of the species of choice, field characteristics, some ecological aspects of the species’ common habitat, commonly associated species, distribution, potential use for restoration purposes, and any special ecological requirements. Lecture materials will include drawings, slides, and plant material. (6.5 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)


    Suggested texts: Cooke. 1997. A Field Guide to the Common Wetland Plants of Western Washington and Northwestern Oregon. Seattle Audubon. Available through University Books Store, Audubon Books Store and Amazon.com.


    Not required but recommended. (I supply much of the information) Gilkey, Halen. Winter Twigs. revised Edition: A Wintertime Key to Deciduous Trees and Shrubs of Northwest Oregon and Western Washington.


    Lunch is provided.


    Instructor: Dr. Sarah Cooke specializes in wetland creation, restoration and enhancement projects, both in design and implementation. She excels in permitting assistance on the local, state, and national level. She has conducted scientific research on wetland ecosystems for the Puget Sound Wetland and Stormwater Management Manual. Her expertise includes restoration designs, wetland inventories, wetland delineation, OHWM studies, baseline studies, impact assessments, monitoring programs, rare plant surveys, soil surveys, vegetation mapping, and watershed analysis in the region.

    • Tuesday, March 03, 2020
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Brightwater Center, Woodinville
    • 9
    Register

      

        

    This course is designed to provide participants with a general overview of the purpose of SEPA, the procedural requirements of the SEPA rules, and how SEPA can be used in decision-making. You will learn how to determine when SEPA environmental review is required, evaluate a proposal and make a threshold determination, issue SEPA documents, and use SEPA supplemental authority to condition or deny a proposal. It will also include a section on nonproject environmental analysis and NEPA-SEPA integration. The class is geared towards lead agencies, but it is also applicable to consultants for project applicants. (6 AICP credits/CEP Points)

                

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructor: Annie Szvetecz has been a senior planner and policy analyst for Ecology since 2004 and currently oversees the statewide administration of the State Environmental Policy Act including the statewide Register, rulemaking, guidance, training and technical assistance.  She has a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Montana and a J.D. from Lewis and Clark School of Law.



    • Wednesday, March 11, 2020
    • 9:00 AM
    • Thursday, March 12, 2020
    • 4:00 PM
    • Lacey Community Center, Lacey
    • 0
    Join waitlist
    This two-day intensive workshop will provide wetland regulators and consultants with practical information and experience in using the 2014 update to the rating system for wetlands in western Washington. It is specifically designed for those who will be using the rating system in the field. You will gain a working knowledge of topics such as the hydrogeomorphic classification of wetlands, how to separate wetlands into units for rating, and how to answer all the questions on the field form. The purpose of the class is to provide you with knowledge so that you can fill out the rating form on your own. You will receive a copy of the rating system manual.

    It is important that you already have some experience and/or education in delineating wetlands and identifying natural wetland features such as outlets, boundaries of basins, vegetation classes, and some ability to distinguish between different plant species. The morning sessions will be held inside. The afternoon sessions will be conducted in local wetlands, so dress appropriately. (12 CM AICP Credits/CEP Points)
     
    Link to rating system:

    https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/publications/SummaryPages/1406029.html

     

    Lunch is provided.

     

    Instructors: 


    Dr. Amy Yahnke is the senior wetland ecologist for the Shorelands and Environmental Assistance Program at the Washington State Department of Ecology. She holds a Certificate in Wetland Science and Management, BS in Environmental Horticulture, MS in Forest Resources, and PhD in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. She has studied wetland ecology within the contexts of amphibians, invasive plants, and stormwater management. Dr. Yahnke has experience teaching a wide range of environmental topics to audiences of all ages.

     

    Neil Molstad is a wetland specialist for the Shorelands and Environmental Assistance Program at the Washington State Department of Ecology.  He holds a BA in Biology and a MS in Soil Science.  His professional specialty is identification of hydric soils and landscape interpretation relating to wetland delineation.  Mr. Molstad’s professional experience includes private sector consulting, public sector service as an environmental scientist for both state and federal government, and teaching middle and high school life science. 

     

     

    • Wednesday, March 18, 2020
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Ecology's Central Regional Office, Yakima (Union Gap)
    • 33
    Register

    When stakeholder engagement is not done thoughtfully, or breaks down altogether, projects can falter, budgets can implode, and the phone can ring off the hook - usually with an unhappy boss, elected official, or irate citizen on the other end!

    This interactive, hands-on training will transform your ability to engage and communicate with stakeholders – both internally and externally - in ways that are efficient, meaningful and will help your project or program succeed. Stakeholder engagement is a crucial aspect of natural resource management. However, many resource managers, planners, and other professionals have either a limited understanding of how to engage stakeholders successfully and/or limited time and budget to do it effectively. Almost everyone has a story of a project that went sideways because of poorly planned or executed stakeholder engagement strategies.

    In this class, you will learn about the increasingly important role that stakeholders play in ecosystem recovery efforts. You will also learn:

    • The building blocks of an effective stakeholder engagement plan and strategies for engaging stakeholders early and for sustained periods of time;
    • How to properly identify stakeholders and make distinctions between different “types” of stakeholders;
    • How to develop efficient, cost-effective strategies that are most effective for each stakeholder group, including whether to form citizens’ or technical advisory committees, and hold public meetings;
    • How to build trust by incorporating stakeholder input in project/program outcomes;
    • How to choose the most effective tools for the job and use it effectively - PowerPoint or glossy brochure? Traditional media or social media? Listserv or PSA? Workshop or public meeting?

    This class is built around lessons learned from 20+ years of stakeholder engagement in the Salish Sea region and U.S. west coast. (6 CM credits)

     

    Lunch is provided.


    Instructors: Hilary Wilkinson and Sarah Brace have designed and implemented stakeholder engagement processes related to Salish Sea ecosystem recovery efforts for close to two decades. In 2008, they co-founded Veda Environmental, a firm dedicated to connecting the dots between science, policy and people in order to protect and restore ecosystems. www.vedaenv.com  Sarah and Hilary design and deliver science communication and stakeholder engagement trainings to federal, state and industry representatives, most recently at the 2017 International Oil Spill Conference. Their audience also includes natural resource managers, scientists, and communications experts from public and private entities. Prior to founding Veda, Hilary and Sarah worked for local government (Hilary) and state (Hilary and Sarah) resource agencies leading public/stakeholder outreach efforts and science/technical advisory panels.
    • Wednesday, March 25, 2020
    • 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
    • Padilla Bay Reserve, Mount Vernon
    • 16
    Register

    This practical, hands-on class is intended for local government personnel and consultants engaged in shoreline permitting activities. The class will take an in-depth look at the permit process and consider both procedural and substantive shoreline management issues. The Washington Administrative Code (WAC) and Revised Code of Washington (RCW) will be reviewed. A permitting exercise will give attendees the opportunity to apply information they learned in the morning presentation and discussion. Afternoon sessions will focus on permitting issues and case studies related to Shoreline Master Programs updated per WAC Guidelines. This class is appropriate for both beginners and more experienced planners. (6.5 CM AICP Credits/ CEP Points)

     

    Lunch is provided.



    Instructors:

    Misty Blair is the statewide Shoreline Management Policy Lead with the Washington State Department of Ecology. The Shoreline Management Policy Lead deals with complex shoreline management issues; researching, developing and implementing new shoreline planning policies, procedures and initiatives; coordinating shoreline planning and permitting activities to ensure statewide consistency; and providing technical support and guidance to SEA program planning staff statewide. Misty has been with Ecology for 5 years and previously worked in environmental planning/permitting for the City of Tacoma. She has a BS in environmental policy and land management from the University of California, Berkeley (2002).


    Peter Katich is a Senior Planner for the City of Gig Harbor where he has managed the update of the City’s Shoreline Master Program in addition to working on a variety of current and long range planning projects. He was an Urban Planner  for the City of Tacoma for 31 years.


    Betty Renkor is a Senior Shorelines Planner with the Washington State Department of Ecology, Shorelands and Environmental Assistance Program. Betty works on Ecology's guidance for Shoreline Master Program updates, including the SMP Handbook and website. She also  assists with SMA policy issues and training. She has worked in environmental and land use planning for local governments and a consulting firm.


    Rebecca Rothwell is the Regional Shorelands Technical and Regulatory Expert represents the SEA Program in the development and review of statewide guidelines, policies, and regulations related to protecting and managing the state’s shorelands, wetlands, and related aquatic resources.  This includes technical assistance to local governments as well as providing higher-level guidance to internal and external staff related to shoreline management.


Past events

Wednesday, December 04, 2019 Adaptation Planning for Coastal Communities
Friday, November 22, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, November 13, 2019 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington (Intended for River Restorationists)
Tuesday, November 05, 2019 Environmental Negotiations
Friday, November 01, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, October 16, 2019 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, October 09, 2019 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Tuesday, October 01, 2019 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, September 25, 2019 CANCELLED - Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs in Eastern WA
Tuesday, September 17, 2019 Facilitation Skills for Scientists, Planners and Resource Managers
Thursday, September 12, 2019 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Wednesday, September 11, 2019 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, July 09, 2019 Riparian and Wetland Plant Identification in Central and Eastern WA
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 Using the Marine Shoreline Design Guidelines for Marine Shoreline Stabilization
Thursday, June 06, 2019 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
Wednesday, May 22, 2019 Designing and Installing Mitigation and Restoration Projects
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Thursday, May 09, 2019 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Tuesday, May 07, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, May 01, 2019 Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings
Wednesday, April 17, 2019 Designing and Installing Mitigation and Restoration Projects
Thursday, April 11, 2019 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 03, 2019 Planning Effective Projects
Wednesday, March 20, 2019 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 14, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, March 13, 2019 Navigating SEPA
Wednesday, March 06, 2019 Plant Identification in Central and Eastern Washington Habitats
Wednesday, January 30, 2019 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Tuesday, January 15, 2019 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Tuesday, November 27, 2018 Environmental Negotiations
Wednesday, November 14, 2018 Gaining Project Traction with Stakeholders: Strategies for Effective and Efficient Engagement
Thursday, November 08, 2018 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Tuesday, October 30, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, October 10, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, October 03, 2018 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, September 26, 2018 Lower Your Risk: Taking the Mystery out of Cultural Resource Management
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 Facilitation Skills for Scientists, Planners and Resource Managers
Wednesday, September 12, 2018 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Friday, June 29, 2018 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Thursday, June 28, 2018 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Wednesday, June 20, 2018 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, June 06, 2018 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
Thursday, May 31, 2018 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Wednesday, May 23, 2018 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark in Eastern WA
Thursday, May 17, 2018 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, May 08, 2018 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 25, 2018 Gaining Project Traction with Stakeholders: Strategies for Effective and Efficient Engagement
Thursday, March 15, 2018 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Thursday, March 08, 2018 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Thursday, February 15, 2018 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Monday, January 29, 2018 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Tuesday, December 12, 2017 Adaptation Planning for Coastal Communities
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 Environmental Negotiations
Monday, October 16, 2017 Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings
Thursday, October 12, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Thursday, October 05, 2017 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, October 04, 2017 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, September 13, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, June 14, 2017 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Tuesday, June 13, 2017 Eelgrass Delineation Training
Wednesday, June 07, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Tuesday, June 06, 2017 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, May 25, 2017 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 Enhancing Your Presentations: Additional Techniques for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, May 02, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Thursday, April 20, 2017 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Thursday, April 13, 2017 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark in Eastern WA
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 16, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 22, 2017 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, February 15, 2017 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Wednesday, February 01, 2017 Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Thursday, January 19, 2017 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, January 11, 2017 How to Communicate about Sea Level Rise
Tuesday, December 06, 2016 Planning Effective Projects
Tuesday, November 08, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, November 03, 2016 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Tuesday, October 25, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, October 18, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Thursday, October 13, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, October 05, 2016 Identifying Wetlands of High Conservation Value Using Vegetation Classification and the Ecological Integrity Assessment (EIA)
Wednesday, October 05, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Wednesday, September 28, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
Wednesday, June 15, 2016 Shoreline Management and Stabilization Using Vegetation (Updated!)
Thursday, June 09, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Tuesday, June 07, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, June 02, 2016 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration (Updated!)
Wednesday, May 18, 2016 Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings (Updated!)
Wednesday, May 04, 2016 Shoreline Management and Stabilization Using Vegetation (Updated!)
Wednesday, April 27, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Thursday, April 07, 2016 How to Conduct a Forage Fish Survey
Wednesday, April 06, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Tuesday, March 22, 2016 Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)
Wednesday, March 02, 2016 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Tuesday, February 23, 2016 Environmental Negotiations
Thursday, February 18, 2016 How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines
Wednesday, February 03, 2016 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
Monday, January 25, 2016 High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (BOTH MORNING AND AFTERNOON)
Monday, January 25, 2016 High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (MORNING SESSION ONLY)
Thursday, January 14, 2016 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Tuesday, December 01, 2015 Climate Adaptation for Coastal Communities
Thursday, November 19, 2015 Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, October 14, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, October 08, 2015 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
Wednesday, September 30, 2015 Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
Wednesday, September 16, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Tuesday, June 16, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
Thursday, May 28, 2015 Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration (Updated!)
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 Environmental Negotiations
Wednesday, May 06, 2015 Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, April 16, 2015 What's New in the Updated Version (2014) of the Washington State Wetland Rating System for Eastern Washington
Tuesday, March 31, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 Coastal Inundation Mapping
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
Thursday, March 12, 2015 What's New in the Updated Version (2014) of the Washington State Wetland Rating System for Western Washington - $95
Thursday, March 05, 2015 How to Administer Development Permits in Eastern Washington’s Shorelines - $75
Thursday, February 26, 2015 How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials - $125
Tuesday, February 24, 2015 Wetlands 101 for Local Planners (webinar) - $25
Wednesday, February 18, 2015 Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats - $190
Thursday, February 05, 2015 Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats - $95
Tuesday, January 13, 2015 Wetlands 101 for Local Planners (webinar) - $25

Washington State Department of Ecology 

 

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